Bollecine! An evening of wine tasting with three different sparkling wines

“Bollecine” means “bubbles” in Italian. It’s a word Italians use to talk about sparkling wine, like an English speaker would say “bubbly”, and for my first wine tasting event, I thought a bit of bubbly would only be appropriate. (As I’m based in Italy the event was in Italian).

Most of my guests were not very experienced wine drinkers, so I prepared a small booklet with some information about the wines to read at their own leisure. I was surprised to find that they were actually very curious and full of questions, making the evening all the more engaging. We eat and drink so often that we rarely take the time to think about and reflect on it, but it’s truly magical when you do because everything becomes exalted.

Here’s how the evening went…

Booklets for guests with evening’s menu and information about the wine
Booklets for the guests with the evening’s menu and information about the wines
Information about the differences between the Martinotti method and the Champenoise method
Information about the differences between the Martinotti method and the Champenoise method
Fruit infused wine for guests to become more familiar with common aromas in sparkling wines
Fruit infused wine for guests to become more familiar with common aromas in sparkling wine

Why bubbly?

– There’s a lot of variety to choose from considering the different regions and styles from Champagne in France, to Prosecco and Franciacorta in Italy, to Cava in Spain, and so on.

-No two sparkling wines are the same. They are categorised by the amount of residual sugars in the wine ranging from pas dosé/zero dosaggio being the driest to doux/ dolce being the sweetest.

-sparkling wine are usually considered as an aperitivo before the meal or for moments of celebration, but they are actually incredible versatile with food pairings and can accompany an entire meal.

Common aromas in Prosecco, or wines from the Martinotti method
Common aromas in Prosecco, or wines made from the Martinotti method
An illustration and brief explanation of the Champenoise method, or “metodo classico” in Italian
An illustration and brief explanation of the Champenoise method, or “metodo classico” in Italian
Common aromas in Champagne, or wines made with the Champenoise method
Common aromas in champagne, or wines made from the Champenoise method

The wines

Drinking wines of a similar style together is a great opportunity to appreciate what they have in common and what makes each one different from the others. This was an essential factor for me in choosing these wines:

Bartolomiol Bandarossa Valdobbiadene Prosecco Superiore Extra Dry Millesemato 2017

Grapes: Glera

Creamy, luscious and delicate. Light, straw yellow colour with a beautiful and delicate perlage, numerous, fine bubbles with persistence. Fresh aromas of pear, green apple, banana and white peach with subtle notes of white flowers. On the palate slightly sweet and creamy balanced by a nice acidity and a gentle tingle from the bubbles, a lemon sherbet finish with a bit of tropical fruit. Juicy, well balanced and harmonious. Not your typical zippy Prosecco, but nonetheless an excellent choice. This was the sweetest and also most gentle of the three wines with a subdued intensity and creamy mouthfeel.

Contadi Castaldi Brùt Franciacorta Brut

Grapes: 80% Chardonnay, 10% Pinot Noir, 10% PinotBianco

Opulent and expansive without being excessive. Crispy, creamy and exquisitely on point. Brilliant straw yellow colour with clearly defined strings of bubbles that persistently rise in the glass. Expansive aromas on the nose showing freshness, complexity and depth starting from crisp aromas of citrus, pear and green apple, opening to floral aromas including honey suckle and magnolia, and closing with more mature notes of oak biscuits, canned pineapple, almonds and honey. On the palate a great balance between acidity and roundness, intense flavours with returning aromas of pear, biscuits and almonds, ending in a lasting finish with a pomegranate persistence. Definitely the most popular of the evening, perhaps because the predominance of Chardonnay which is in most people’s comfort zone.

Philipponnat Royale Réserve Brut Champagne

Grapes: 65% Pinot Noir, 30% Chardonnay, 30% Pinot Meunier

Intriguing, expressive and warm with power and refinement. Luminous, straw yellow colour with gold hues and an elegant perlage with fine, persistent bubbles. Warm aromas of citrus, mandarin, cranberry, orange blossom, magnolia, dried roses, dried apricot, vanilla, toasted nuts and brioche expressing complexity with subdued intensity. On the palate it is powerful and well balanced with high acidity and minerality and a bit of sweetness. Intense flavours and quite aggressive bubbles with a long persistence of pomegranate and plum. This was the most complex and austere wine of the evening, leaving some guests perplexed and champagne lovers excited!

Food pairings

Food pairing: mozzarella and marinated anchovies with Bartolomiol Bandarossa Prosecco

The dish in itself is already harmonious as the juicy, fatness of the mozzarella is balanced by the saltiness of the anchovies. Because sparkling wine could become too aggressive with highly salty food, I choose a sweeter Prosecco. Paired with this extra dry Prosecco this harmony of the dish is enhanced as the acidity and effervescence of the bubbles cleans the palate and a touch of sweetness completes the taste profile.

Food pairing: fresh anchovy tart with Contadi Costaldi Brùt

Fresh anchovies were used this time, baked in the oven with potato purée, herbs and breadcrumbs to create a fragrant, savoury and delicate dish. The fruit and floral aromas of the wine compliment the seafood and herbal aromas of the dish with equal persistence and the acidity and effervescence of the bubbles cleans the palate of their starchy elements, creating a sophisticated harmony.

Food pairing: zucchini flower risotto with Philipponnat Brut Champagne

A creamy risotto with sweet, sautéed zucchini flowers is enriched by the earthy flavour of smoked provola and the citrus of lemon zest. It’s a highly aromatic dish which calls for a wine that is equally rich. This champagne does not disappoint with intense aromas of red fruits and spices and a persistent perlage and structure. The result is a delicious, rich combination with a refined harmony.

More wine tasting adventures to come!

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6 thoughts on “Bollecine! An evening of wine tasting with three different sparkling wines

Add yours

  1. This is quite brilliant Danell, I think it’s your first event posting? If only we lived near you …. I know we disagree and tease each other about “tasting” but if I attended your events like this I think some of my cynicism may mellow. I don’t think I have ever seen such care and information created for guests, larger bodies doing tastings should take note. I think I’ll Reblog it if you don’t mind, maybe a tweet too? (I’ve started my guest post for you ….. deep philosophy and personal ….. and wine of course😂😂)

    Liked by 1 person

      1. The general idea started to gel this morning at 6am! I thought and wrote for an hour but then had a five hour drive to get home. Now enjoying a glass of Fourchaume Premier Cru Chablis after a week of only beer.

        Liked by 1 person

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